CHAOSTOCOSMOS

Friday, 22 January 2016

Childhood trauma associated with worse impulse control in adulthood, study finds: Abuse or neglect associated with worse executive function in adults, whether or not they have bipolar disorder

The scars of childhood abuse and neglect affect adults' brains for decades to come -- including their ability to process and act on information both quickly and accurately, new research suggests. That kind of quick "go or don't go" thinking is crucial to everyday situations like driving or rare events like reacting to an emergency. And it appears to be less accurate and more impulsive in adults who suffered physical, emotional or sexual trauma in their early years than in those who did not, the study finds. The new findings about impulse control add to a growing body of evidence about the lasting scars that traumatic childhood experiences can leave. The researchers, led by a University of Michigan Medical School neuropsychologist, say adults who suffered trauma as children may benefit from talk therapy or other options to combat the effects.

Childhood trauma associated with worse impulse control in adulthood, study finds: Abuse or neglect associated with worse executive function in adults, whether or not they have bipolar disorder
Pamela is a former accountant, recovering journalist and international cat herder, disabled and chronically sick with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis, Fibromyalgia and Cervical spondylosis, fluent in three languages; English, Spanish and Rubbish. Mostly writes in the latter. She likes Genealogy, Model Railways and Cats.

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