CHAOSTOCOSMOS

Sunday, 31 January 2016

Further insights into war against data sharing: Science Media Centre’s letter writing campaign to UK Parliament

The motive is simple. If the claims of the PACE investigators are as credible, then disabled people who are getting payments from the government can be required to get cognitive behaviour therapy as a condition for continuing their payments. Of course, it has been gradually unfolding that CBT or Graded Exercise Therapy (GET) can not get chronic fatigue/myalgic encephamyelitis patients back to work. And a course of GET makes many of them more disabled. But who cares when requirement that these patients be in such treatment can be used to deny social welfare payments to them?

Further insights into war against data sharing: Science Media Centre’s letter writing campaign to UK Parliament

Typical food triggers creation of regulatory T cells

Typical food triggers immune tolerance in the small intestine. Credit: IBS

Researchers document how normal diet establishes immune tolerance conditions in the small intestine

Our immune system evolved to attack foreign materials entering our body. Food is technically foreign, but it is somehow tolerated by the immune system so that our body can absorb the nutrients. The immune system has built-in tolerance mechanisms that harness itself from responding to benign foreign antigens beneficial to our system, like food. When such tolerance fails, we suffer from an overt immune reaction, such as food allergies, which can be severe enough to be fatal. Despite the increasing incidence and severity of food allergies, the details on how immune tolerance to dietary antigens is normally established remain largely unknown. Scientists from the Academy of Immunology and Microbiology (AIM) within IBS in South Korea have recently uncovered one of the key mechanisms in the small intestine that triggers this process.

Typical food triggers creation of regulatory T cells

Saturday, 30 January 2016

Southampton Model Railway Exhibition 2016

Haul
On Saturday, 30th January, we paid a visit to the Southampton Model Railway Exhibition 2016 at Barton Peveril Sixth Form College in Eastleigh. Although it was a pretty big show, we didn't see any layouts with ideas relevant to what we're building. On the other hand, there were a very good number of trade stalls, where we were able to pick up a few needed items.

Friday, 29 January 2016

Why you won't lose weight with exercise alone



Exercise by itself isn't always enough to take off the weight. Now, evidence reported in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on January 28 helps to explain why that is: our bodies adapt to higher activity levels, so that people don't necessarily burn extra calories even if they exercise more.

Why you won't lose weight with exercise alone

How M.E. was never associated with Fatigue.

The symptom of post-exertional muscle fatigue used here is very different from the symptom of perceived, non-post-exertional general fatigue, the subjective feeling of tiredness, used as the basis for making a CFS diagnosis. Perhaps post-exertional muscle depletion or dysfunction would have been a better term to use than "muscle fatigue" to avoid confusion with subjective, perceived fatigue. Muscle fatigue can be objectively measured. Perceived, general fatigue can only be evaluated by psychometric questionnaires – an important distinction.

How M.E. was never associated with Fatigue.

Wednesday, 27 January 2016

The Truth About PIP Assessment Centres Plus Your Medical Records For Sale

In this edition we have the first results of our request for information about Atos personal independence payment (PIP) face-to-face assessment centres. Elsewhere in today’s newsletter we reveal that you have only a short time to opt out of having your identifiable, confidential GP medical records sold, with the help of Atos, to drug companies and who knows who else?

The Truth About PIP Assessment Centres Plus Your Medical Records For Sale

Tuesday, 26 January 2016

New low in psychiatry, rheumatoid arthritis and carpal tunnel syndrome are now called a conversion disorder ...

They have an agenda to be able to say, "Examples of psychosomatic illnesses include chronic fatigue syndrome, migraines and tension headaches, rheumatoid arthritis, carpal tunnel syndrome, skin disorders, eating disorders, tinnitus, tension myositis syndrome, fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, and others."

New low in psychiatry, rheumatoid arthritis and carpal tunnel syndrome are now called a conversion disorder ...

Doctors bribed with 70-90k salaries to join Maximus and “endorse a political agenda regardless of how it affects patients.”

The National Audit Office (NAO) scrutinises public spending for Parliament and is independent of government. An audit report earlier this month concluded that the Department for Work and Pension’s spending on contracts for disability benefit assessments is expected to double in 2016/17 compared with 2014/15. The government’s flagship welfare-cut scheme will be actually spending more money on the assessments themselves than it is saving in reductions to the benefits bill – as Frances Ryan pointed out in the Guardian, it’s the political equivalent of burning bundles of £50 notes.

Doctors bribed with 70-90k salaries to join Maximus and “endorse a political agenda regardless of how it affects patients.”

Monday, 25 January 2016

Scotch broth


Recipe to follow.

Walking and Thinking - Not a Good Combo in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS)

It appears that a panoply of problems - from brain deficits to balance issues to metabolic problems to muscle issues - could interfere with walking in ME/CFS. Several portions of the process of walking - such as visually scoping out your path, planning the movement, moving your muscles smoothly, balancing properly, etc. could be effected. It's no wonder that for many people with ME/CFS a walk in the park is often anything but relaxing.

Walking and Thinking - Not a Good Combo in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS)

Friday, 22 January 2016

Mitochondrial DNA and ME/CFS - One Pathogen, Many Responses

A new study of mitochondrial DNA in ME/CFS patients has provided some important clues as to the variation of symptoms seen in patients. This study provides a rationale for outbreaks and clusters. It also accounts for both the discrepancies in Fukuda, CCC, and ICC clinical case definitions as well as the large number of possible combinations of symptoms. These case definitions may be describing the same illness, caused by the same pathogen, as it is experienced by people with distinct genetic variations.

Mitochondrial DNA and ME/CFS - One Pathogen, Many Responses

Childhood trauma associated with worse impulse control in adulthood, study finds: Abuse or neglect associated with worse executive function in adults, whether or not they have bipolar disorder

The scars of childhood abuse and neglect affect adults' brains for decades to come -- including their ability to process and act on information both quickly and accurately, new research suggests. That kind of quick "go or don't go" thinking is crucial to everyday situations like driving or rare events like reacting to an emergency. And it appears to be less accurate and more impulsive in adults who suffered physical, emotional or sexual trauma in their early years than in those who did not, the study finds. The new findings about impulse control add to a growing body of evidence about the lasting scars that traumatic childhood experiences can leave. The researchers, led by a University of Michigan Medical School neuropsychologist, say adults who suffered trauma as children may benefit from talk therapy or other options to combat the effects.

Childhood trauma associated with worse impulse control in adulthood, study finds: Abuse or neglect associated with worse executive function in adults, whether or not they have bipolar disorder

Thursday, 21 January 2016

What you eat can influence how you sleep: Daily intake of fiber, saturated fat and sugar may impact sleep quality

A new study found that eating less fiber, more saturated fat and more sugar is associated with lighter, less restorative, and more disrupted sleep. Results show that greater fiber intake predicted more time spent in the stage of deep, slow wave sleep. In contrast, a higher percentage of energy from saturated fat predicted less slow wave sleep. Greater sugar intake also was associated with more arousals from sleep.

What you eat can influence how you sleep: Daily intake of fiber, saturated fat and sugar may impact sleep quality

What you eat can influence how you sleep: Daily intake of fiber, saturated fat and sugar may impact sleep quality

A new study found that eating less fiber, more saturated fat and more sugar is associated with lighter, less restorative, and more disrupted sleep. Results show that greater fiber intake predicted more time spent in the stage of deep, slow wave sleep. In contrast, a higher percentage of energy from saturated fat predicted less slow wave sleep. Greater sugar intake also was associated with more arousals from sleep.

What you eat can influence how you sleep: Daily intake of fiber, saturated fat and sugar may impact sleep quality

Missing link found between brain, immune system; major disease implications

In a stunning discovery that overturns decades of textbook teaching, researchers have determined that the brain is directly connected to the immune system by vessels previously thought not to exist. The discovery could have profound implications for diseases from autism to Alzheimer's to multiple sclerosis.

Missing link found between brain, immune system; major disease implications

Tuesday, 19 January 2016

PACE trial investigators basically acknowledge in the Lancet that CBT and GET are useless ...

So basically their treatments offer hope but nothing else ... Hope for the therapists to earn money from ineffective and harmful treatments but no hope for the patients to get their health and independence back.

PACE trial investigators basically acknowledge in the Lancet that CBT and GET are useless ...

The Healthy Gut Summit

We’ve recently seen how powerful gut flora manipulation can be for some people with ME/CFS/FM. Now a  week-long “Healthy Gut Summit” is occurring that some people might find useful. These summits, which generally focus on alternative ways to treat illnesses, can pack a lot of “easily digestible” information in over a short period of time.

The Healthy Gut Summit

Fibromyalgia: A Very Different Disease

In the end survey suggested that compared to fibromyalgia, some pretty serious illnesses are relative walks in the park symptom wise. Take lupus. Lupus is a serious disease which can kill you. For me, lupus would be pretty high on my list of diseases I really would rather not have, yet the lupus patients at this hospital rarely experienced widespread pain and reported about half the pain, fatigue and problems with functioning that fibromyalgia patients did.

The findings were reminiscent of a study Health Rising reported on recently where people with chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) essentially trounced people with major chronic illnesses when it came to quality of life and functionality.

These are not races anyone wants to win but they are races the medical community should pay attention to.

Fibromyalgia: A Very Different Disease

Monday, 18 January 2016

You eat what you are? Changing identity to motivate healthy eating


If you've resolved to eat more healthily this New Year's, you might find that imagining yourself as a healthy eater is the key to changing your behaviour for the better. Writing in the journal Self & Identity, Amanda M. Brouwer and Katie E. Mosack explore the concept of 'self as doer' and whether it could be of use in changing people's eating habits.

You eat what you are? Changing identity to motivate healthy eating

Wednesday, 13 January 2016

700 Mile Round Trip For PIP Medical Plus AA To Be Axed

In this edition we expose the scandal of the cruel and possibly unlawful system for sending claimants to distant PIP assessment centres. Plus, we’re asking you to share your knowledge of a PIP assessment centre, if you’ve been to one. We also cover the official report on the chaotic and expensive mess that outsourced PIP and ESA assessments have become.

In addition, we warn of the plan to abolish attendance allowance for new claims.

13 January 2016 newsletter

Sunday, 10 January 2016

Consultation as government seek to limit disabled people’s eligibility for Personal Independence Payment

The government are conducting a consultation and invite views from all interested parties, especially disabled people and disability organisations. The review led the government to conclude that PIP doesn’t currently fulfil the original policy intent, which was to cut costs and “target” the benefit to “those with the greatest need.” That basically meant a narrowing of eligibility criteria for people formerly claiming Disability Living Allowance, increasing the number of reassessements required, and limiting the number of successful claims. 



Consultation as government seek to limit disabled people’s eligibility for Personal Independence Payment

Fit to work assessments by DWP cost more money than they save, leaving taxpayers to foot the bill for Iain Duncan-Smith's failure

The Government is spending more money assessing whether people are fit to work than it is saving in reductions to the benefits bill, a damning official report has revealed

The study by the National Audit Office (NAO) found that the Department for Work and Pensions is handing over £1.6bn over the next three years to private contractors who carry out the controversial health and disability assessments.

But at the same time, the Government’s own financial watchdog has warned that savings in benefits payments are likely to be less than a billion pounds by 2020 as a result of the new tests.



Fit to work assessments by DWP cost more money than they save, leaving taxpayers to foot the bill for Iain Duncan-Smith's failure



[ED] And I would bet that most of the so-called "savings in benefits payments" are actually achieved by denying people benefits to which they are entitled anyway.

Monday, 4 January 2016

2015 Year in Review


Happy New Year and thanks again to all the lovely doggies, amongst them the sixteen pictured; Teekee and Baloo, Casper and Katie, Max, Elvis, Daisy, Dodger, Lenny and Lucy, Tia, Ellie, Sasha and Summer, Milo and Lucky who all helped to make our 2015 one filled with much love and waggy tails.

Sunday, 3 January 2016

The Best, Least, Biggest and Strangest: An ME/CFS and FM Look Back at 2015

Biggest Gut Punches to the Federal Neglect of ME/CFS – Two federally funded reports land a gut punch to the NIH’s historical neglect of chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS).  They both call for urgent increases in support.



The Best, Least, Biggest and Strangest: An ME/CFS and FM Look Back at 2015

Saturday, 2 January 2016

Hangovers aren't caused by dehydration, low blood sugar, or acetaldehyde

If you're familiar with ME/CFS and fibro, then inflammatory response, cytokines, the immune system and gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) are certainly not new terms to you. Might this also explain why we often feel like we have a hangover, even when we haven't had a drink and, why we often have varying and variable levels of intolerance to alcohol? It's going to take a heck of a lot more than a bit of Ibuprofen to sort us out, but maybe something in this research will lead to something that might also give us some symptomatic relief.

AHRG’s researchers have begun to converge on a promising ­theory about what really causes hangovers: namely, that they’re an inflammatory response, like what happens when we get an infection. A team in Korea noticed that hangovers are accompanied by elevated levels of molecules called cytokines, which are used as communication signals by the immune system. If you inject those into a healthy subject, that person will start to have all kinds of familiar-sounding symptoms, including nausea, gastrointestinal distress, headache, chills, and fatigue. Potentially even more interesting, higher-than-normal cytokine levels also interfere with memory formation—which might account for ethanol-­related lapses in recall as well.
Hangovers aren't caused by dehydration, low blood sugar, or acetaldehyde

Tories urged to push disabled benefit claimants onto private insurance schemes

Any suggestion that sickness benefits may be handed over to private firms is a call to condemn people with long-term health conditions to neglect, poverty and death. 



Tories urged to push disabled benefit claimants onto private insurance schemes
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