CHAOSTOCOSMOS

Saturday, 31 October 2015

Ghoulish goulash and terrifying tagliatelle


We served this for Halloween, hence the name, but was actually based upon this recipe for Hungarian Goulash.

Serves 4

Ingredients


    397g/14oz can chopped tomatoes
    2 onions, finely chopped
    2 green peppers, deseeded & diced
    900g lean braising steak
    2 level tbsp paprika pepper
    ¼ level tsp caraway seeds
    1 bay leaf
    Pinch of marjoram
    Pinch of thyme
    Seasoning

Method

Place the tomatoes and onions in a pan and cook until the onions are soft. Add the peppers and cook for a further 5 minutes. Cut the steak into 5cm strips and add to the pan. Add the paprika, caraway seeds, bay leaf, marjoram, thyme and tomato mixture and season well. Cover and cook over a low heat (or in a moderate oven 150°C/130°C Fan/Gas 2) for 1½ - 1¾ hours.

Serve with tagliatelle and vegetables of your choice. 

PACE Trial Authors Feeling the Heat Over Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Trial

The PACE trial authors appear to have done themselves few favors by presenting their side of the argument.



Their responses demonstrated two things:

  1. Tuller’s critique and the response to it by the patient community has hit home and
  2. they don’t have answers to most of his questions.
Notice that every change
they made it more possible for the trial to get positive results. Notice
how moderate the results were even with these added boosts.




Consider the fact that the
researchers were never blinded to the results flooding in. Consider the
possibility that they gloamed early on to the fact that things were not
going their way and that changes needed to be made.




PACE Trial Authors Feeling the Heat Over Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Trial

Friday, 30 October 2015

Diet lacking soluble fiber promotes weight gain, mouse study suggests

Eating too much high-fat, high-calorie food is considered the primary cause of obesity and obesity-related disease, including diabetes. While the excess calories consumed are a direct cause of the fat accumulation, scientists suspect that low-grade inflammation due to an altered gut microbiome may also be involved. 



Diet lacking soluble fiber promotes weight gain, mouse study suggests -- ScienceDaily

Thursday, 29 October 2015

Serotonin: Is it an Important Factor in Fibromyalgia?

Serotonin, also known as 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) is an important chemical neurotransmitter found in the human body. Serotonin is manufactured in the brain and the intestines. The majority of the body’s serotonin (90%) is found in the gastrointestinal tract where it regulates intestinal movements that stimulate gut motility. The remainder is found in the central nervous system and blood platelets where it plays a role in the formation of blood clots through vasoconstriction. It is synthesized along with its metabolite 5-hydroxtryptophan (5-HTP) from the amino acid L-tryptophan.



Serotonin: Is it an Important Factor in Fibromyalgia?

Monday, 26 October 2015

Investigative Reporter Shreds PACE Trial: Calls Mount for Retraction

Investigative Journalist and public health expert David Tuller, academic
coordinator of the concurrent masters degree program in public health
and journalism at the University of California, Berkeley, 
published his investigation into the UK’s £5 million PACE trial, on the well known Virology Blog (see Parts 1 and 2, Part 3 and Part 4).



Investigative Reporter Shreds PACE Trial: Calls Mount for Retraction


Friday, 23 October 2015

Study finds Cognitive Behavioral Treatment exacerbates CFS/ME symptoms

Therapy was effective in remediating the young person's mood difficulties, but appeared to exacerbate their CFS/ME symptoms. Therefore, it is crucial that CFS/ME and mood treatments are designed and trialed to ensure a complementary approach. Good communication and joint working between involved professionals is also important, and ideally, treatments for mood and for CFS/ME would be provided by the same team to facilitate this.



Study finds Cognitive Behavioral Treatment exacerbates CFS/ME symptoms

Investigative Reporter Shreds PACE CBT/GET Trial: Calls Mount for Independent Review

“I’m shocked that the Lancet published it…The PACE study has so many flaws and there are so many questions you’d want to ask about it that I don’t understand how it got through any kind of peer review.”​ Dr. Ronald Davis, Stanford University
David Tuller has published several long pieces on chronic fatigue syndrome but his piece “TRIAL BY ERROR: The Troubling Case of the PACE Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Study” on the UK’s federally funded PACE CBT/GET trial may be the most impactful.  The trial with it’s many problems  proved to be catnip for this investigative journalist – there was just so much there…



Investigative Reporter Shreds PACE CBT/GET Trial: Calls Mount for Independent Review

Are All the "Feel-Good" Pathways Blocked in Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome?

Missing that runner’s high? (Any high at all?) Your living circumstances or the losses you have endured may not be to blame. The loss of those good feelings may not be due to depression.  Physiology could be behind all of them.

“Highs” or good feelings it turns out are, or should be, a natural part of living. Our body uses good feelings to reward good behaviors such as exercise.
relaxing

What happened to those good feelings? Did the pathways that produce them get blocked?

But what if the reward system isn’t working? What if the production of those good-feeling chemicals are blocked? Does it result in something like fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS).

The evidence – most of it indirect to be sure – suggests that many of the pathways that produce feelings of pleasure, relaxation and rest may be blocked in these diseases.

Are All the "Feel-Good" Pathways Blocked in Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome?

Tuesday, 20 October 2015

How to - Dr. Bell on Understanding Orthostatic Intolerance in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Fibromyalgia

Fainting is called ‘syncope’, and the stage just before fainting is called ‘pre-syncope’. One attractive theory about ME is that it is a constant state of pre-syncope.

When a healthy person faints after standing too long on a hot day, the rest of the day they have severe fatigue. Presumably this is because there requires a recovery period after the sudden decreased blood flow which caused the faint. The same thing happens after a concussion. A good rule of thumb is that the fatigue after a head injury or faint should be gone after a good night’s sleep, a sleep that is ‘restorative’, again, something that does not occur in ME.



How to - Dr. Bell on Understanding Orthostatic Intolerance in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Fibromyalgia

Monday, 19 October 2015

Christchurch Model Railway Club 2015 Exhibition


Here's one shot of the beautifully detailed East Ilsley, which we saw yesterday at the Christchurch Model Railway Club 2015 Exhibition (more images) at Bournemouth School for Girls.

Our takeaway from this exhibition - I do try to learn something each time - involved coal houses and access to them. It's certainly true that when modelling an older period - well anything up to the 1960's and 70's - one might remember that most rural homes, as well as the vast number of Victorian/Edwardian terraces will have an outside khazi

We were reminded yesterday that these dwellings would also have needed coal and will have had a coal house, most likely out back somewhere, with access for deliveries that wasn't through the house. The lady of the house, being houseproud, would have spent ages scrubbing the front step, so she certainly would not have allowed coal to be traipsed in through the front!

From a practical point of view, this reminder will prompt us make space for all the back alleys and pathways, which will more realistically portray the fictional settings at Porthkeres.

Sunday, 18 October 2015

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Fibromyalgia and Mitchondrial Disorders: A Comparison

Several recent blogs have suggested mitochondrial problems may exist in chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia. This blog takes a different cut at the mitochondrial question. It asks if the symptom patterns found in these two diseases fit those found in mitochondrial disorders.

Chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia can cause so many symptoms that they can lead themselves to a variety of diagnoses. That’s a problem, but it turns out that the sheer number of symptoms found in these disorders may be a clue. Not many diseases can produce such a rich broth of symptoms.



Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Fibromyalgia and Mitchondrial Disorders: A Comparison

Thursday, 15 October 2015

My wife and child are disabled, I care for them. Govt have made our lives a living hell. No government should do this to citizens

This distortion of the truth by this government is absolutely appalling. They portray a nation of lazy scroungers – when in fact unemployed people account for only 3% of welfare spending. And, of course, unemployed does not automatically equal ‘lazy’.

The reality is that, after pensions, people in work are a much bigger draw on welfare benefits.

That is largely down to pay being grossly insufficient. The State knows pay is too low – that’s why all the in-work benefits exist.



My wife and child are disabled, I care for them. Govt have made our lives a living hell. No government should do this to citizens. | Thomas Hemingford

Monday, 12 October 2015

Is Lactic Acidosis Behind Many Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Fibromyalgia Symptoms?

“Patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) are affected by symptoms of cognitive dysfunction and neurological impairment, the cause of which has yet to be elucidated. However, these symptoms are strikingly similar to those of patients presented with D-lactic acidosis... this might explain not only neurocognitive dysfunction in CFS patients but also mitochondrial dysfunction, these findings may have important clinical implications.”



Is Lactic Acidosis Behind Many Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Fibromyalgia Symptoms?

Sunday, 11 October 2015

What is ME fatigue?

Forget what you think you know about fatigue



... while normal fatigue is proportional to the intensity and duration of activity, followed by a quick restoration of energy, ME fatigue is characterized by a pathological low threshold of physical and mental fatigability, exhaustion, pain, and an abnormal exacerbation of symptoms in response to exertion. It is followed by a prolonged recovery period.



What is ME fatigue?

Brain scans show impairment in ME/CFS at rest

The study identified decreased intrinsic connectivity among regions within the left fronto-parietal networks.

Also, the study confirmed functional connectivity in patients with ME/CFS was significantly correlated with the severity of their chronic fatigue.

Both the findings of impairment at rest and correlation with fatigue severity add to mounting evidence of physical dysfunction in ME/CFS and highlight areas for future research into the disabling disease.



Brain scans show impairment in ME/CFS at rest

Thursday, 8 October 2015

Our very own contribution to #Tocktober


Our latest guest showing ... well, thanks to the modesty tail, just some impecable timing and a knowledge of internet teminology.

Study highlights which fruits and vegetables can aid weight loss

When most health
messages highlight the generic benefits of fruits and vegetables, what I
like about this one is that it compared 70 of them in relation to body
weight changes.

This huge observational study followed the diets of 133,468 men and
women for 24 years. It looked at their consumption of 70 unprocessed
fruits and vegetables in relation to their body weight. Here’s what they
found:





Source: © The Health Sciences Academy. All Rights Reserved.



Read more: thehealthsciencesacademy.org/science-catch-up/science-catch-up-6/
When most health
messages highlight the generic benefits of fruits and vegetables, what I
like about this one is that it compared 70 of them in relation to body
weight changes.

This huge observational study followed the diets of 133,468 men and
women for 24 years. It looked at their consumption of 70 unprocessed
fruits and vegetables in relation to their body weight. Here’s what they
found:





Source: © The Health Sciences Academy. All Rights Reserved.



Read more: thehealthsciencesacademy.org/science-catch-up/science-catch-up-6/


When most health messages highlight the generic benefits of fruits and vegetables, what I like about this one is that it compared 70 of them in relation to body weight changes.

This huge observational study followed the diets of 133,468 men and women for 24 years. It looked at their consumption of 70 unprocessed fruits and vegetables in relation to their body weight. Here’s what they found:

Science Catch-up - The Health Sciences Academy

Wednesday, 7 October 2015

All Lifetime DLA Claimants Can Now Be Forced Onto PIP As Roll-Out Goes Nationwide

In this edition we learn that all working age DLA claimants with lifetime awards can now be forced to apply for PIP; warn of possible plans to merge PIP with ESA and wonder whether more ESA claimants are to be called for reassessments, as Maximus offer £84,000 salaries to new assessors.

We also report on the disability charity working with Maximus and discover how the DWP are desperately trying to cover up the deaths of vulnerable ESA claimants.



7 October 2015 newsletter

Monday, 5 October 2015

How to - Dr. Bell on Understanding Orthostatic Intolerance in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Fibromyalgia | Health Rising's Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS)

Here is a good way to tell if you have orthostatic intolerance. You are walking around the supermarket for fifteen minutes and you are doing alright. The act of walking helps to circulate blood to your brain by the muscle contractions in your legs. Then you stand at the check-out counter and the person in front of you has lots of coupons. You stand still for ten minutes and then you feel that you have to lie down. The standing still causes blood to pool in the legs and less gets to the brain. This is orthostatic intolerance.



Dr. Bell on Understanding Orthostatic Intolerance in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Fibromyalgia

Thursday, 1 October 2015

If the Tories don’t like being compared to the Nazis, then they need to stop behaving like despots

Whilst I am very aware that we need take care not to trivialise the terrible events of the Holocaust by making casual comparisons, there are some clear and important parallels with what is happening to sick and disabled people, poor people and those who are unemployed in the UK and the ideological processes in Nazi Germany: events on a socio-political and a psycho-social level, that I feel are crucially important to recognise.



If the Tories don’t like being compared to the Nazis, then they need to stop behaving like despots


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