CHAOSTOCOSMOS

Wednesday, 31 January 2018

Hundreds Of Thousands May Get PIP Increase As 1.6 Million Claims Looked At Again

In this newsletter we celebrate the decision of the DWP to admit defeat in their battle to discriminate against PIP mobility claimants with mental health conditions. We also look at what the decision to review 1.6 million PIP awards, as a result of the DWP climbdown, might mean in practice. We highlight a consultation taking place on extending blue badges to more claimants with mental health conditions. It’s the result of another victory in the courts for claimants. Plus we reveal that massive misery of universal credit is set to save the DWP just 2% compared to leaving things as they were.

Hundreds Of Thousands May Get PIP Increase As 1.6 Million Claims Looked At Again

Wednesday, 17 January 2018

Weston-Super-Mare Model Railway Show 2018



There is something to learn at every model railway exhibition and the Weston-Super-Mare Model Railway show on Sunday, 14 January 2018 was no exception.

In Porthkeres the port is as important as the railway, so I find layouts with water to be of interest. Above are a couple of images of Red Hook Bay. The gorgeous paddle boat seems to be a relatively recent addition. I was particularly impressed by the realistic modelling of the water. (Not sure I believe mermaids are real though!)

Also of interest at this show were Moose Creek and Avyn-A-Llyin.

PIP Mobility For Mental Health Update, McVey Returns, Bogus Tip-Offs

In this newsletter we look at the victories scored by claimants with mental health conditions trying to claim PIP mobility. We also advise on what you should consider if you may be affected. We bemoan the unwelcome return and promotion of Esther McVey. We also look at bogus benefits fraud tip-offs and reveal that Atos fully support the idea of recording PIP assessments.

PIP Mobility For Mental Health Update, McVey Returns, Bogus Tip-Offs

Wednesday, 13 December 2017

Why The DWP Is Happy To Lose So Many Cut-Price PIP And ESA Appeals Plus Tory MP Weeps At Plight Of Claimants

In this edition we learn about the scandalously small amount of money the DWP spend on mandatory reconsiderations and appeals and why they are happy to go on losing the majority of PIP and ESA appeals.

We discover that up to 60% of PIP assessment reports created by Capita health professionals have been found to be unacceptable, but they are still used to make decisions on people’s benefits.

We ponder about how it is possible to be moved to tears by the plight of claimants, whilst still voting to cut their benefits.

Why The DWP Is Happy To Lose So Many Cut-Price PIP And ESA Appeals Plus Tory MP Weeps At Plight Of Claimants

Wednesday, 29 November 2017

PIP And DLA Claimants To Get 65p Increase, Hunt For 75,000 ESA Claimants Owed Thousands Each

In this update we highlight the 2018 benefits uprating figures, which will see personal independence payment (PIP) and disability living allowance (DLA) claimants get as little as 65p a week extra, whilst many working age benefits are frozen altogether for another year.

We also reveal that the DWP are trying to identify 75,000 employment and support allowance (ESA) claimants who are owed thousands of pounds each.

We warn that claimants are being pushed into claiming universal credit (UC) instead of ESA, even though they will be worse off.

And we flag up the increasing number of presenting officers appearing at PIP and ESA tribunals.

PIP And DLA Claimants To Get 65p Increase, Hunt For 75,000 ESA Claimants Owed Thousands Each

Tuesday, 21 November 2017

Ways to Improve Orthostatic intolerance


Orthostatic intolerance (OI) is a term used for illnesses which are characterized by inability to maintain the upright posture or, bend, stoop, stand, etc without feeling faint or dizzy. Of course, when this decrease of blood pressure occurs, it can also be followed by weakness, nausea, abdominal pain, and sweating.

It is a group of illnesses that overlaps with ME/CFS and Fibro. Most anyone with Fibro or ME/CFS have one or more of these conditions.

Some with these type of conditions may need blood pressure meds or meds designed to slow speeding heart rate. Many times, they can be helped by doing some simple things. Mine has been helped by doing the following :

  • When sitting up in bed, never get right up afterward. Count slowly to 10 before rising to stand.
  • If bending, stooping, getting down into a tub, etc - try to keep your head above your heart as you position yourself.
    (This helps prevent the blood pressure drop)
  • It can drop quickly and then comes back up, as to not be able to detect, if you take your blood pressure afterward.
  • If you have to get down to do something under a counter, rise up part of the way and sit on a chair stool, etc - then count to 10 before standing.
  • Staying well hydrated helps us to keep our blood volume to a good place which also helps diminish this issue with blood pressure drops. 

There is a test called the tilt table test to check for one of these conditions. However, its not an easy test and designed to see if and when you'll pass out.

A simple test that any Dr. can do is to have you lie on the table, rest for a few minutes - check your blood pressure - then have you sit up with the cuff on, quickly check the blood pressure - have you stand quickly, check the blood pressure.

Here is the list of the different types. However, they are so similar in nature, we may be diagnosed with the best one which the Dr feels fits us. I was checked by a cardiologist and told I have NMH but he also said it may be POTS - due to the two being so similar in nature.

  1. Orthostatic Systolic Hypotension Where the upper number (systolic) blood pressure drops.
  2. POTS - Stands for Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome A healthy person will not change their heart rate standing up for an hour. In a person with POTS, this heart rate increases around 26 beats per minute.
  3. Orthostatic Narrowing of the Pulse Pressure The pulse pressure is the difference between the upper number of the BP and the lower number. For example, a normal person with a BP of 100/60 would have a pulse pressure of 40. When standing still people with this condition have a drop in their pulse pressure.
  4. Orthostatic Diastolic Hypertension This condition will raise the lower BP number in [the body's] attempt to push blood up to the brain.
  5. Orthostatic Diastolic Hypotension - also called Neurally Mediated Hypotension This represents a fall in the lower number of the BP.

Shared with permission.

Clarissa Shepherd is author of Find Your Way: A Guide to Healing While Living With Chronic Fatigue Immune Dysfunction Syndrome and Fibromyalgia

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